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Kristallnacht logo NYU'S ANNUAL INCLUSIVE KRISTALLNACHT PROGRAM- NOVEMBER 9, 2010

KRISTALLNACHT- Historical Note:
On November 9, 1938 Hitler used the killing of a German diplomat in Paris to start the "spontaneous" planned assault on the Jewish Community. It was meant to see if the world would react to the beginnings of the Holocaust.
Thousands of synagogues and Jewish businesses were destroyed and approximately 20,000-30,000 Jewish men were rounded up and sent to concentration camps on that day merely for being Jewish.
Since 1990 Rick Landman (whose father and grandfather were sent to Dachau on Kristallnacht) has conducted a program at either CBST and/or NYU to remember how a civilized country could turn into a mass murdering society. Instead of repeating a Yom Hashoah service, the Kristallnacht programs were all inclusive; inviting groups representing some of the other Victims of the Nazi era who were also mistreated during the years leading up to Kristallnacht.

NYU

Participants in the program (not in order of position): Rick Landman, Reni Hanau, Rabbi Sarna, Daniel Low, Bill Bokoff, Chelsea GArbell, Debbie Dreyfuss, Ari Sarna, Alexandra Lebovits, Hana Nudelman, Michael Kasdan.

border=0 The program was conducted in the Kimmel Center at NYU, Room 914.

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Reni Hanau was born in Fulda, Germany. Experiencing the war as a young child, Ms. Hanau remembers witnessing her home burn down on Kristallnacht. Her father was then taken to the Buchenwald concentration camp, but her family escaped to England in June 1939. Upon arrival they were interned on the Isle of Mann as “enemy aliens.” They left for the United States in September 1940. She graduated from City College and taught for thirty years in the New York City school system. From the time she retired in 1991 until 1994, she taught ESL to Russian immigrants. She is a Museum of Jewish Heritage Gallery Educator as well as a member of the Speakers Bureau.

The 2010 Program included a talk by Rick Landman who compared what was life like for Jews and African Americans in the USA to life for German Jews up until 1933 and why it was so hard for German Jews to decide to leave Germany before the realities of Kristallnacht. He also stressed that we must speak out against bullying of any type when it occurs; remembering that Hitler also came for the Communists, Trade Unionists, Homosexuals and Disabled Person along with the Jews.
poster PAST COMMEMORATIONS

Since 1990, we conducted a program at either NYU or CBST to commemorate Kristallnacht. Unlike Yom HaShoah, which most synaogogues commemorated, we used Kristallnacht as a historical event to explore what happened to the Jewish Community and other victims during the Nazi Era. The programs were both memorials and educational in nature.


NYU'S ANNUAL INCLUSIVE KRISTALLNACHT PROGRAM- NOVEMBER 9, 2009

krist09
Photo from 2009 Program
[From left to right: Lindsay Firestone, Emma Hutchinson, Yoni Gamliel, Rick Landman, Lindsay Geier, Rachel Berg, Gabriel Slamovits, Ayelet Scheiber, Lori Levine, Rachel Slaff, Kathrin DiPaola, Patricia Schneidewind ]


krist09vigil
Photo from a separate AEPi Candlelight Vigil in Washington Square Park in commemoration of Kristallnacht after the program.

If we do not study our history and memorialize our dead; who will?
And if we don't then how can we prevent atrocities from repeating?


COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 2009
Monday, November 9, 2009
FROM 7-8 p.m.
at the Bronfman Center for Jewish Living
7 East 10th Street – 2nd floor


In co-sponsorship with:
The Bronfman Center for Jewish Living at NYU
The Deutsches Haus at NYU
The Henry and Lucy Moses Center for Students with Disabilities
NYU Office of LGBT Student Services
Congregation Beth Simchat Torah

In Commemoration of the 71st Anniversary of Kristallnacht, NYU will be conducting its annual inclusive candle lighting ceremony to memorialize the six million Jews, and all of the other victims of the Nazi era, including the disabled, homosexual, Gypsy communities, Jehovah Witnesses, and others including anti-Hitler Germans who were killed for protecting Jews and for anti-Nazi activities.

In addition, Rick Landman, a second/third generation Holocaust Survivor will speak. Rick Landman's father Henry was arrested on Kristallnacht and sent to Dachau Concentration Camp at the age of 18. Rick will give a minute by minute account of Henry's day from the time he went to sleep in his bedroom in Augsburg until he was sleeping on the floor of a barrack in Dachau the next night. Henry was released from Dachau a few months later and came to America where he later joined the US Army and was with the first Americans to liberate Dachau and enter his hometown of Augsburg.

Time permitting, Rick will give a status update of the New York City Holocaust Memorial Park in Sheepshead Bay as to the other victims of the Nazi era.


NAME OF SPONSORING GROUP NAME OF REPRESENTATIVE NAME OF PERSON/GROUP BEING MEMORIALIZED
The Bronfman Center Lindsay Firestone, Emma Hutchinson, Gabriel Slamovits, Ayelet Scheiber, Lori Levine, Lindsay Geier, Rachel Berg, Yoni Gamliel Babi Yar and 6 million Jews
The Deutsches Haus Kathrin DiPaola
Patricia Schneidewind
Biracial children who were denied the right to grow up based on their race. Mulatto Children who were brutally sterilized and died during the Nazi Dictatorship.
LGBT Student Affairs/KESHET Emma Hutchinson General Statement
Moses Center Rachel L. Slaff General Statement


COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 2007

Wednesday, November 7, 2007
FROM 7-8 p.m.
at the Bronfman Center for Jewish Living
7 East 10th Street – 2nd floor

In co-sponsorship with:
The Bronfman Center for Jewish Living at NYU
The Deutsches Haus at NYU
The Henry and Lucy Moses Center for Students with Disabilities
NYU Office of LGBT Student Services
Congregation Beth Simchat Torah

In Commemoration of the 69th Anniversary of Kristallnacht, NYU will be conducting an inclusive candle lighting ceremony to memorialize the six million Jews, and all of the other victims of the Nazi era, including the disabled, homosexual, Gypsy communities, Jehovah Witnesses, and others including anti-Hitler Germans who were killed for protecting Jews and for anti-Nazi activities.

In addition, Rick Landman, a gay son and grandson of two Jewish men who were arrested and interned in Dachau on the day after Kristallnacht will make a presentation. Rick will not only relate the 24 hour history of how Kristallnacht affected his father’s life, but will also explain why he decided to reinstate German Citizenship to become a dual citizen. He is now a gay, Jewish, American son of Holocaust Survivors who is also a German citizen. The program will end with a question and answer period.


COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 2005

HOLOCAUST PROGRAM

krist05
November 9, 2005 – 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

NYU’s Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life
at 7 East 10th Street, New York, NY 10003

Co-sponsored by: NYU’s Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life, NYU’s Office of LGBT Student Affairs, NYU’s Center for Students with Disabilities, NYU’s Deutsches Haus, Congregation Beth Simchat Torah.

Presented by Rick Landman, Esq., founder of the International Association of Lesbian and Gay Children of Holocaust Survivors, as well as an administrator and adjunct Professor at NYU.

PROGRAM

• Brief History of early Nazi years 1933-1938 focusing on how a civilized country can turn into a murdering machine in only five years.
• 24 hour Description of the life of Henry and Joseph Landman of Augsburg from November 9 - 10, 1938, from sleeping at home to sleeping in Dachau.
• All inclusive Candle Lighting Service to memorialize all civilians who died due to Nazi Persecution. Presenters:
Jennifer Kohanim of the Bronfman Center for Jewish Life memorializing the 6 million Jews that were murdered and those who had to flee or hide for their lives.
Dr. Kathrin DiPPaola and Zachary Hasychak of the Deutsches Haus, memorializing all of the German civilians who were killed due to their anti-Nazi actions, including the “White Rose Society” of the University of Munich.
Marisa Lenger of the Center for Students with Disabilities memorializing all those people with Disabilities that were murdered from the earliest years of the Nazi regime years before Kristallnacht and throughout the war years.
………… of the Office of LGBT Student Affairs memorializing all those who were murdered and persecuted due to their sexual orientation.
Rabbi Ayelet S. Cohen of Congregation Beth Simchat Torah (serving the LGBT Community and their families and friends) memorializing all those other victims of the Nazi era that have no one else to remember them.
• Slide presentation of Pre-Kristallnacht Synagogues of Germany along with the music of Jan Pierce singing “Es Brennt”.
• Story of the “Little Torah”- how this 200 year old Torah came to the U.S.A. from Germany and was returned to Munich’s new congregation Beth Shalom last Kristallnacht 2004 – in a slide presentation.
REFRESHMENTS AND QUESTIONS & ANSWER PERIOD AFTER THE PROGRAM.

For Further Information: (212) 998-2365 or rick.landman@nyu.edu



Click here to read about the 2004 Kristallnacht Program where I returned a Holocaust Torah back to a Liberal Congregation in Munich Germany


"Kristallnacht- Holocaust Memorial Program 2001"

CBST's Annual KRISTALLNACHT Commemoration
Sponsored by the Lehrhaus Judaica - (212) 929-9498
Thursday, November 8, 2001
8:05-9:30 pm. at 57 Bethune Street (up the ramp)
No Admission Charge or Lehrhaus Charge.

Every year Congregation Beth Simchat Torah has commemorated the anniversary of the beginning of the Holocaust by remembering Kristallnacht (night of November 9, 1938). On that night the round-up and internment of Jewish men began, and thousands of Jewish shops were destroyed and hundreds of synagogues burned.

This year Rick Landman, founder of Lesbian and Gay Children of Holocaust Survivors (www.infotrue.com) will conduct the following multi-media program through the Lehrhaus Judaica.

THIS YEAR'S SPECIAL TOPIC: Should Holocaust Memorials & Restitution Funds include what happened to the Homosexual Community?

PROGRAM

1. Moment of Silence and Slide show of former German Synagogues.
2. Rick will relate the first hand accounts of how his father (then 18 years of age) was rounded up by the Gestapo and sent to Dachau on the morning after Kristallnacht.
3. New York City's Sheepshead Bay Holocaust Memorial Park - Why is there no stone relating what happened to the homosexuals during the era? Discussion of other Memorials which are inclusive.
4. The Pink Triangle Coalition and Restitution Funds for homosexual inmates.
5. Status of Jewry in Germany today.
6. How the fight for gay marriages in 1964 led to the second "Holocaust Torah" coming to CBST in the 1990's.
No admission charge or Lehrhaus charge.


COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 1997

CONGREGATION BETH SIMCHAT TORAH and the International Association of Lesbian & Gay Children of Holocaust Survivors

cordially invites you to our Annual:


Kristallnacht was the night that Hitler showed the world that he was serious about exterminating all Jews. On November 9, 1938, hundreds of synagogues and thousands of Jewish stores were destroyed, and about 30,000 Jewish men were sent to concentration camps for the "crime of being Jewish".

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1997 at 7:30 p.m.

This year’s program will include an informal talk by Otto and Susanne Perl, (Marty’s parents who came from Vienna). Otto Perl was already in Dachau in November 1938 and could tell us what happened from an unique perspective. Come hear his fascinating story!!! In addition, his mother will relate her experiences too. There are only a few survivors who can still relate first hand about what happened on Kristallnacht. We are grateful of their desire to share their stories.

Do you want to visit to the “Holocaust Museum” in Battery Park City? We have 50 reserved tickets at $7.00 per adult for a tour of the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust for Sunday afternoon, January 18, 1998 from 3:30-5:00pm. Sold Out! Wait List Only. Contact Rick Landman.


COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 1996

CONGREGATION BETH SIMCHAT TORAH,
in conjunction with the International Association of Lesbian
and Gay Children of Holocaust Survivors


Thursday, November 7, 1996 at 7:30 pm

Kristallnacht was the night that Hitler showed the world that he was serious about exterminating all Jews. On November 9, 1938, hundreds of synagogues and thousands of Jewish stores were destroyed, and about 30,000 Jewish men were sent to concentration camps for the "crime of being Jewish".

Program: Is there a Gay Kristallnacht?
Should today’s lesbian and gay community choose a day to Acknowledge and Remember the Homosexual Persecution during the Nazi Era?
Discussion of above and the Homosexual Monuments Controversy with a Video Presentation as well as the "Night of the Long Knives" to explore if homophobia was used as an explanation for murder.
COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 1995

CONGREGATION BETH SIMCHAT TORAH,
in conjunction with the International Association of Lesbian
and Gay Children of Holocaust Survivors


Monday, November 6, 1995 at 7:30 pm

Kristallnacht was the night that Hitler showed the world that he was serious about exterminating all Jews. On November 9, 1938, hundreds of synagogues and thousands of Jewish stores were destroyed, and about 30,000 Jewish men were sent to concentration camps for the "crime of being Jewish".

Program: Homosexual Persecution during the Nazi Era- Myths vs. Reality
In the early 1930’s, Himmler started his Committee to Combat Homosexuality and Abortion…
Homosexual gathering places were closed, anti-gay laws were strengthened, Dr. Hirschfield’s Sexual Science Institute was destroyed along with the early book burnings (May 1933), men were arrested and sent to labor camps as “Pink Triangle” prisoners, lesbians were sent to brothels… way before Kristallnacht.
Rick Landman will report on the September Conference at the University of London, where for the first time in history, a conference was held to discuss the realities of what happened to the homosexuals during Nazism. Questions and Answer Period to follow, along with the issue of whether CBST should have a plaque in memory of the homosexuals persecuted and murdered.
COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 1994

The Education Committee of
CONGREGATION BETH SIMCHAT TORAH,
in conjunction with the International Association of Lesbian
and Gay Children of Holocaust Survivors


Tuesday, November 8, 1994 at 7:30 pm

Kristallnacht was the night that Hitler showed the world that he was serious about exterminating all Jews. On November 9, 1938, hundreds of synagogues and thousands of Jewish stores were destroyed, and about 30,000 Jewish men were sent to concentration camps for the "crime of being Jewish".

Program: We have invited those post war Germans who are working with Project Ezra on the Lower East Side (taking care of Holocaust Survivors) as an alternative to German military service) and their friends in order to have a discussion of what effects the Holocaust has had on the next generation of Germans and Jews.

In addition, we are sponsoring a fund raising drive (with CBST) to assist the Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C.
COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 1993

The Education Committee of
CONGREGATION BETH SIMCHAT TORAH,
in conjunction with the Gay Sons of Holocaust Survivors
with the Jewish Lesbian Daughters of Holocaust Survivors


Sunday, November 7, 1993 at 7:30 pm

Kristallnacht was the night that Hitler showed the world that he was serious about exterminating all Jews. On November 9, 1938, hundreds of synagogues and thousands of Jewish stores were destroyed, and about 30,000 Jewish men were sent to concentration camps for the "crime of being Jewish".

Program: As part of the program, Rick Landman will bring to CBST another Torah which was saved from the Holocaust (which his grandfather brought to America in 1945) and will relate the story of how the Torah was saved. The theme of the nights commemoration will be to feel how this moment in history affected the lives of those Jews who lived through it.
COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 1992

The Education Committee of
CONGREGATION BETH SIMCHAT TORAH,
in conjunction with the Gay Sons of Holocaust Survivors
with the Jewish Lesbian Daughters of Holocaust Survivors


Sunday, November 8, 1992 at 7:30 pm

Kristallnacht was the night that Hitler showed the world that he was serious about exterminating all Jews. On November 9, 1938, hundreds of synagogues and thousands of Jewish stores were destroyed, and about 30,000 Jewish men were sent to concentration camps for the "crime of being Jewish".

Program: As part of the program, Henry Landman will relate his story of what happened to him on that fateful night.
COMMEMORATION OF KRISTALLNACHT 1990

The Education Committee of
CONGREGATION BETH SIMCHAT TORAH,
in conjunction with the Gay Sons of Holocaust Survivors
with the Jewish Lesbian Daughters of Holocaust Survivors





KRISTALLNACHT
November 10, 1938

The following copyright material is from the manuscript written by Rick Landman.
It relates the 24 hour period from the time his father goes to sleep in his bed in Augsburg until he goes to bed the next day in Dachau.


It was November 9, 1938 and my 18 year old father and his family went to sleep in their apartment in Augsburg as usual after hearing on the radio that a 17 year old Jewish boy shot a German official in Paris. Two Gestapo agents in green Bavarian garb rang the doorbell at his family’s apartment at 5 a.m. in the morning. His aunt (who was to die a few years later in the camps) answered the door. All they said was, “Does Heinz Landmann live here?”

She pointed to his bedroom and stood silently in the hallway. They entered the room and woke him up, telling him to get dressed and go with them. His parents now joined his aunt silently in the doorway as he passed by in his Lederhosen (Bavarian leather short pants). My father whispered, “Auf Wiedersehen” as he passed them by and his sisters never even got up from their sleep.

Joseph, my father’s father was not on the list to be picked up by the Gestapo, since they had other plans for him. As my father went to the local police station he passed the Synagogue while it was still smoldering. He saw all of the lines of fire hoses on the ground. The fire engines were watering down the surrounding buildings and were letting the Synagogue burn in a rather controlled and strange fashion.

He was the first person brought to the police station and had no idea of why he was arrested. At first he thought it might be for kissing an Aryan girl or some violation like that. But when he saw more Jewish men being brought into the cell, he knew something else was up. He had just turned eighteen years of age that summer, so he was the youngest and probably the shortest man arrested.

At daybreak my grandfather went out to find Mr. Leopold Rieser, a well-known Jewish attorney, to see if he could get my father out of jail. But on the way, another Gestapo agent saw Joseph on the street and asked if he was Jewish. Saying yes, Joseph was arrested on the spot and by dusk my father and grandfather were sitting on a bench next to each other waiting in silence. Mr. Rieser, the lawyer was also arrested but separated from the rest of the Jews for special treatment.

Finally all the Jewish men in the local police station were taken by a paddy wagen (Gruene Minna) to one Central prison before the “accordion-style” buses showed up to bring everyone to their secret destination. My father and grandfather sat next to each other in the bus. In the seat behind my father was Erich Teutsch, the son of Justizrat Doktor Artur Teutsch. They lived in the same apartment house; just one floor below the Landmanns. Artur Teutsch was an important lawyer who was a decorated hero and wounded in the First World War fighting for the Kaiser, so he wasn’t arrested on Kristallnacht. Erich had to go to Dachau alone. Sad to say, that he and his wife would not get a Visa and would later be sent to the Judenhaus and then to their death in another concentration camps. Erich Teutsch would survive and become the father of David Teutsch who was a president of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College for years and his wife Betsy would illustrate one of the prayer books that CBST uses. As a further coincidence, Betsy would be the calligrapher who prepared the wedding invitations for the first lesbian who joined my group of children of Holocaust Survivors. Since I was also invited, she had to calligraphy an invitation for me. It is a small world.

The buses’ windows were covered, and while no one said the word, even my 18 year old father was anxious that Dachau was their secret destination. Augsburg is near Munich, and Dachau is one of Munich’s suburbs. The bus got stuck and lost several times during the ride; it was hard for such a long bus to maneuver on narrow roads. Henry peaked out the window and guessed that they were headed towards the place with the gate “Arbeit Macht Frei”. He was terrified.

When they arrived they had to leave the bus rapidly without speaking, and run inside to line up on a long row of people. Those who didn’t act quickly enough were hit or beaten. While lined up, Nazi officers would go up and down the line yelling at everyone, and asking them questions with no definitive answer. Henry wanted to say whatever he thought the Nazi wanted to hear, but he didn’t know what the right answer was. He heard what was asked of others earlier on the line and what they answered.

When the Nazi asked another man a question, the Jew answered and was beaten for not completing his answer with the Nazi equivalent of “Sir”. Henry knew all of the appropriate titles and would immediately answer with “Yes Herr Sturmbannfuehrer…” to prevent him being beaten.

But when the Nazi stood in front of him he shouted, “Did you say good bye to your mother before you left home this morning?”

If Henry answered “Yes”; then the Nazi would respond, “Good, because now you are going to be shot”.

If he said, “No”, then the Nazi would say, “Too bad, because you’re never going to see her again”. Either way he made it clear that he was not going home alive.

Henry hesitated for a second while trying to think of the proper answer which annoyed the man. The Nazi merely grabbed him by the collar and pulled him out of the line and yelled, “Up against the wall!”

Henry didn’t look back at his father but merely walked up to the wall expecting his imminent death. He waited and waited for shots to ring out but nothing happened. Waiting so long to be shot was rude and insulted his ingrained feeling of Deutsche Puentlichkeit (German punctuality).

He asked himself, “What is the worst that they could do to me if he walked away, shoot me?” So he slowly walked backwards taking little steps each time towards the line of men standing a few yards away.

A tall Jewish man gave him cover as he melded back into the line. Being so small does have the advantage of letting one melt into a crowd. This time a different Nazi walked by and just passed without interrogating him. This was the man who we bumped into decades later in Manhattan. To this day, when things go badly, my father will joke, “It’s not so bad when compared to being put up against the wall to be shot”. I think that I must have inherited his Dachau sense of humor.

But the next morning my father would hear an event that would stay in his mind for the rest of his life. Henry was standing in audible range of the entry area in Dachau when a vehicle pulled up. He could hear the Nazis yelling at a man and then the man being dragged and beaten. He then recognized that it was Mr. Leopold Rieser, the well known attorney who his father wanted to retain earlier the previous day. He was beaten to his death right there in the entry way to Dachau and never even joined the rest of the Augsburg Jews in the camp.

My grandfather was released so that he could officially and legally turn over the Sportsplatz to the Nazis. This gave him the chance to try to get a visa out of the country. My father stayed in Dachau for 6 more weeks. The same stories that I heard were just verfied when my father would give them a first hand accounting. His Capo was a derrainged person who was in the camp for years before the Jews came. They said that he suffered from Stubenkoller (a sort of cabin fever) where he just wanted to please his Nazi supervisor and was sort of in a zombie-like gray state of being. But both my father and grandfather survived their stay in the camp and now had no doubts about their number desire to leave Germany.

Kristallnacht was Hitler’s way of testing whether the world would really lift a finger to save Jews. He got his answer and knew that he could go forward with not only attacking Poland, but with starting the Final Solution of the Jews. Now all German Jews tried to get out of Germany, but few countries would give them visas to enter.

Rick Landman

Copyright 2007

landmanClick here to learn more about what happened to Henry Landman when he was sent to Dachau on Kristallnacht
Click here to read a story written about Henry Landman as part of a project by Veronika Stumpf. It was read at Dachau as part of a memorial service in 2004
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